HDR is the Future of TV.

HDR What is it?

In light of all the latest craze in the television market, the acronym HDR keeps popping up.  What is it? What does it stand for? HDR means High Definition Range.  It stems from a term in photography.  As the human eye interprets vivid color in multiple layers the camera, however, lacks justice in capturing all the nuances of the scene. An SDR Standard Definition Range is most common in home theaters.

In comparison, High Definition Range refers to a technique that heightens a picture’s dynamic range – the contrast between the brightest whites and the darkest blacks. The approach is that the higher the dynamic range, the more a picture resembles a real life view.

Think about a time when you saw a spectacular sunset. Now consider the layers of glowing fiery red, orange and pink pastel colors enhanced by bright white clouds in the forefront.  In this scene painted for you, there should be distinguishable degrees of brightness. However, on the TV the layers look flat and dull with white levels smashed and layers that are virtually impossible to tell apart. There are multiple reasons for this.

Why the need for HDR?

The first reason is your TV’s limited dynamic range, it is not capable of reliving the real view picture in the finest differences in brightness.

In addition, the video you are watching has gone through multiple stages of processing and converting data to match what your Television is capable of. This ultimately takes away the quality in its end result.

In recent breakthroughs, TVs are much more capable. When our Elite A/V team attended the CES 2017 (consumer electronics show) we were in awe at the levels of brightness in newer TVs. Check out this video out we shot there!

A normal TV puts out around 100-300nits of brightness whereas an HDR TV is working on the capability of 10,000nits.   It’s not just sheer brightness we are after.  Too bright and it can be blinding.  The combination of luminance, color gamut, and color range all have to co-exist to give you the darkest dark to the whitest white on the screen.

Modern LED screens appear dim and dark blacks look gray because of their pixels being backlit. When you glance at a screen with the milky way you want the richest black color you can get to enhance the brightness of the stars and their glow.

At Elite A/V LLC, we all consider ourselves quality television lovers.  We want your upgraded home theater installation in Las Vegas to be the most knowledgeable choice you make this year.   HDR is the future of home theaters. Let us Hang a TV for you today that will allow you and your family to experience endless enjoyment for years to come.

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Britni Yates (Author)

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